Cover Reveal and Pre-Order The Playground by C.S. Boyack

A splendid storyteller, Craig Boyack is a prolific writer. He has one of the most creative minds I have come across. His work, while all well-crafted, is not genre specific. He is able to develop interesting concepts into fascinating stories that defy genre conventions. One of my favorite categories on his blog is the Idea Mill, where he shares unusual research tid-bits and then develops ideas for mini short stories from what he has gleaned. I invite you to follow his blog and check out his latest novel creation.

Introducing The Playground
The Playground

The hottest toys of the Christmas Season are the Playground Network dolls. They contain a worldwide social network for children. Except, the network is controlled by a ruthless businessman with dreams of power.

To reach his goals he turns to the occult. Will our children make up his personal army? Could we have an enemy soldier in every home?

Gina Greybill is a cancer survivor who stumbles into her own brush with the paranormal. She wants nothing to do with it, but may be the only one who can bring down the Playground Network. To do it she’ll have to embrace her new situation, and recover the next generation of Playground software.

There is competition for the software in the form of a brutal thug named Clovis. He’s bigger, more ruthless, and more experienced. To top it all off, he has a head start.

The Playground is suitable for more mature readers, due to violence and mature themes.

You can pre-order this book by clicking Here!

***

I was born in a town called Elko, Nevada. I like to tell everyone I was born in a small town in the 1940s. I’m not quite that old, but Elko has always been a little behind the times. This gives me a unique perspective of earlier times, and other ways of getting by. Some of this bleeds through into my fiction.

I moved to Idaho right after the turn of the century, and never looked back. My writing career was born here, with access to other writers and critique groups I jumped in with both feet.

I like to write about things that have something unusual. My works are in the realm of science fiction, paranormal, and fantasy. The goal is to entertain you for a few hours. I hope you enjoy the ride.

Craig

 

Follow my blog: http://coldhandboyack.wordpress.com

Check out my novels here: http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B00ILXBXUY

 

Twitter: https://twitter.com/Virgilante

 

On Goodreads: http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/9841203.C_S_Boyack

 

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ColdhandBoyack

Kickstarter Campaign for Sci-Fi Magazine

kickstarter

 

What is Nonlocal Science Fiction?

Nonlocal Science Fiction is a quarterly digital magazine featuring short stories and serials from emerging science fiction authors from around the world. The first issue launches on March 14th!

 

Who is Nonlocal Science Fiction?

Nonlocal Science Fiction is published by 33rd Street Digital Press, a new independent digital publishing company owned and operated by Daniel J. Dombrowski.

 

What makes Nonlocal Science Fiction different?

Built from the ground up to function as a dynamic digital publication, Nonlocal partners with its authors directly and offers them a share of the profits from the sale of the magazine rather than a per-word rate that minimizes the value of a story submission.

Nonlocal involves its authors in a comprehensive digital marketing campaign which benefits the authors directly both by increasing sales and by giving independent authors valuable marketing knowledge and experience.

 

Why is Nonlocal Science Fiction doing a Kickstarter?

The Kickstarter will cover all costs to publish the first issue and help diffuse the expenses already incurred while organizing 33rd Street Digital Press.

More than that, the Kickstarter will help build a foundation of support for the magazine as supporters will become primary advocates. Every backer receives a copy of the magazine and has the chance to get limited edition merchandise and additional eBooks from authors appearing in Issue #1.

The top stretch goal for the magazine earns every backer a LIFETIME subscription to the magazine.

 

Is Dan available for interviews and guest posts?

YES! At any time, please feel free to email Dan (dan@thirtythirdstreet.com) to request an interview or a guest post about any topic you wish relating to the magazine or 33rd Street.

 

Anything else I should know?

After the launch of the first issue, all 10 authors appearing in the issue will be available for interviews! You will be receiving contact info for all authors and a complimentary copy of the first issue once it launches.

 

What are the relevant links?

33rd Street Digital Press website: http://thirtythirdstreet.com

Nonlocal Science Fiction website: http://nonlocalscifi.com

Kickstarter: http://kck.st/1KORMlN

Twitter: https://twitter.com/33rdStreetPress

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/33rdStreetPress

Story Summaries

All of these stories will appear in the first issue of Nonlocal Science Fiction.

Us and Everybody Else by Valery Amborski In the future, we’ll be able to escape, very literally, into our memories. But is it a good idea to live for the past?

 

Delivery to Venus by Robert Paul Blumenstein The Earth has become a ball of ice as the sun slowly burns out. A team of scientists must face the ultimate questions of existence while they sow seeds on Venus.

 

A Thin Atmosphere, Chapter 1 by Dan Colton Mars City comes under attack by tunnel-dwelling Rebels in the first chapter of this old-school space adventure serial.

 

Mazep-fal by Daniel J. Dombrowski A man who is both the youngest and oldest member of his tribe makes a terrible discovery on a pilgrimage to meet his gods.

 

Marigold’s Memory by Reva Russell English In a future where human memory is stored on microchip implants and bad memories can be erased, a young woman faces a terrible fate.

 

Catalyst by Aaron Hamilton A daring escape in a stolen spacecraft and a mysterious and alluring rescuer leave a smuggler wondering what will happen next.

 

Deal Gone Bad, Chapter 1 by Thad Kanupp Jack survives in a post-apocalyptic wasteland by scavenging guns and ammunition. His life is about to get a lot more interesting.

 

Shoot the Devil by Nicholas Rossis What would you do if you could travel back in time? If you had the devil in your sites, would you pull the trigger?

 

The Assistant Assistant Port Keeper by Jim Rudnick Life as an Assistant Assistant Port Keeper in a space port on the Rim has its highs and its lows. A visit from a particularly difficult species of traders presents an opportunity for both.

 

In The Days Of Still Pictures by H.C. Turk In an alternate wild west where cowboys ride zebras and elephants pull wagons, a pair of traveling salesmen appear and stir up trouble with their magical wares.

A few samples of what’s to come…

“In The Days Of Still Pictures” by H. C. Turk

At the desert’s edge, where dry heat created transient visions, sat the town of Vargo, Dakoda Territory, population low and unknown in the year 1873. Remarkable the newcomers passing through. Miners heading for the promised platinum out west just stopping for some drugs at the saloon. Damn herd of elephants ran right through the streets once. Really tore up the place. Your big city journalist seeking the “truth of the Amerigan frontier,” like a profundity misplaced.

Some people stayed for one reason or none, for one duration or another. The photographer, Mizzer Benjumin Roze, had been present a month, but not many people could afford his family portraits. A traveling salesman changed that, providing Mzr. Benjumin with a plenitude of business, an enterprise to unhinge this Erth frontier…

 

“Marigold’s Memory” by Reva Russell English

The second time she tried to have the chip unlocated, she went into cardiac arrest, her heart’s rhythm a high-pitched “eeeeeeeee” that showed itself on the monitor as a thin and serious line that stretched between the farthest cosmic reaches of an infinite point A and the farthest cosmic reaches of an infinite point B…

 

“Deal Gone Bad” by Thad Kanupp

I woke up with a scorpion on my face. It was crunchier than I prefer, but I’ve had worse breakfasts.

I crawled out of the scrub patch where I’d slept, tongue poking at the chitin stuck in my teeth. Dew had beaded across my skin overnight, and I was shivering. By noon I would trade it for sweat under the ruthless wasteland sun and be longing for the dripping bushes I’d hidden in for the night. That’s man for you. Want what you want ‘til you get it, and not a minute longer—one thing that held true for everyone. I needed it to…

 

“Catalyst” by Aaron Hamilton

Cribbs tried not to think of how lucky they had been, afraid he would somehow cause the scales to tip back against them. He hadn’t stopped to question it when his cell door slid open, or when his impounded ship was released from grav-lock, or even when they escaped without pursuit. But his cynicism resurfaced as his pulse slowed…

Book Review: Seneca Scourge by Carrie Rubin

Carrie Rubin is a physician who has a humor blog here: The Write Transition

She makes me chuckle with every post. She is a most insightful person and it is a pleasure to know her.

She is also an author and has a wonderful award winning book out: “Seneca Scourge”.  If you have not read it yet, I highly encourage you to give it a read.

Seneca Scourge is a medical thriller/sci-fi. It starts off like many other medical thrillers with a terrible disease we must find a cure for. Rubin did not choose some complex disease that no one could relate to. She chose a familiar one. It is an influenza strain that devolves from an ordinary common occurrence into a nightmare with the potential to infect billions around the globe. Dr. Sydney McKnight gets assigned to do research with Dr. Casper Jones, a rather odd fellow who whose behavior sends up some red flags.

People are dying. The numbers are more than alarming. Racing to beat the clock on this dreadful disease that starts out innocently enough, Sydney is appalled when she discovers Casper Jones injecting her patient with something he passes off as steroids. Here is where the medical thriller that has kept you on the edge of your seat takes an unusual twist with a sci-fi flavor that is remarkably creative and fascinating to read. Suspending disbelief is part of the fun!

Rubin does a fantastic job creating characters and situations that touch your soul. Being a health care provider myself, I was enthralled by the realism of the hospital situation in crisis. It reminded me of the ten days we suffered in 2004 with four hurricanes back to back and overflowing hallways, only worse. There is no end in sight. When the light appears at the end of the tunnel, the book takes yet another unexpected twist. The ending was interesting and made me think deeply on the future of medicine.

If you want a fast paced, well-written read that is full of unexpected twists and turns, you will enjoy this book.

I give it 5 out of 5 stars.

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Book Reviews: Catskinner’s Book and Cannibal Hearts by Misha Burnett

These are Volume One and Volume Two of The Book of Lost Doors sci-fi/urban fantasy series.

Volume One: Catskinner’s Book

5 Stars

I absolutely loved this story! The relationship of the main character(s), James and Catskinner, was psychologically fascinating as these two personalities were profoundly interesting. I could hear the distinctive voices of each in my head. The dialogue between them was well done, and contributed to the plot development.

The plot moved at a steady, quick pace with one intriguing adventure after another. As soon as you recovered from one incident another was put before you. The mechanics and descriptiveness of scenario was both plausible and fantastic.

Two things I thoroughly enjoyed about this book: 1) the accessibility of the writing style, and 2) the genius creativity and imagination expressed through the author’s imagery. I would highly recommend it if you are looking for a psychologically dynamic sci-fi/fantasy story.

Volume Two: Cannibal Hearts

4 stars

Of course, after being so very delighted with Burnett’s Catskinner’s Book, I had to read this one right away. I was initially mildly disappointed that Catskinner’s role seemed to take a back seat to James’, though I still found the story line most intriguing. It seemed that James, as narrator, ruminated more in this book. There was less of the dialogue between him and Catskinner and less of the quick paced action that I had enjoyed so much in the previous book.

As the story progressed, again, Burnett’s creative genius showed through and I found myself deeply involved and invested in discovery. Alien actually became comfortable. The unusual and colorful cast of characters was so well drawn that I feel as if I have a whole new set of friends, and enemies, in this book–even the weirdest. Be advised, I like weird. I will also add here, I loved the profound, original, and thought provoking quotes the author included under each chapter heading. I am eagerly anticipating the third in the series.

You can purchase these books here: Catskinner’s Book and Cannibal Hearts 

You can get to know Misha Burnett and learn more about his upcoming book, “The Worms of Heaven” here on his blog.

As a side note, 

I’m going to qualify regarding my science fiction reading. I cut my teeth on science fiction. Back in the seventies, as a young teen, my Grandma’s neighbor was a young man by the name of Michael Bishop. I spent some boring summer days in my Grandma’s small town, Pine Mountain, Georgia. The boredom was relieved by my visits to Mr. Bishop’s library.

Mr. Bishop was, still is, a science fiction writer and author of many books, including one (correction: three) for which he received the Nebula Award. He was also nominated for the Hugo Award. I did not read his works, because he had not yet published them, but he had inherited an enormous library from his father-in-law and it filled the turreted two-story library of his home. Many days I heard him clacking away at the typewriter through an open window in his library.

I would stop in to annoy visit with Mr. Bishop from time to time and was most impressed by both the library and his devotion to writing. Michael would loan me books from his library and send me away.

The books he loaned me were titles by authors such as Isaac Asimov, Ursula K. Le Guin, and others. I loved being able to escape to fantastical other worlds. Asimov, with his background in biochemistry, and Le Guin, with her mix of fantasy and sci-fi kept me entertained for hours on end. I truly loved the sort of sci-fi they wrote. Mr. Bishop, who was also my Sunday school teacher upon a time, and I would review the books when I brought them back.

Then, in a young girl’s life, many years later, around the mid-eighties, something happened to the sci-fi that I ran across. It got so complex and outer-space oriented that you needed an astrophysics degree or an alien translator to follow plots or decipher difficult sentences and name structures. Names lost their vowels, and plots became so implausible that I lost interest totally in the genre. I began to read more straight up fantasy…witches and vampires, magic that professed to be magic, immortals, and such.

I never went back to sci-fi, and I said all of that to say this: Thank you, Misha Burnett, for bringing me back to earth with these fascinating and intriguing mixed genre sci-fi/fantasy tales!